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AJRR Launches New User Group Network at AAOS Meeting

March 27, 2015

Network is intended to help users share data and best practices.

Talk about perfect timing.

More like strategic timing, really. It was no coincidence that American Joint Replacement Registry (AJRR) executives scheduled the launch of the organization's first-ever User Group Network at the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) 2015 Annual Meeting in Las Vegas, Nev. Exposure from the five-day meeting is virtually priceless.

"The AJRR User Group Network is intended to serve as a place in which information and best practices can be shared," Executive Director Jeffrey P. Knezovich said. "We want all of our participants and interested parties to take full advantage of this opportunity to learn more about AJRR and any future plans that may be on the horizon."

The network provides a forum for those who work closely with the registry to stay connected and share both data and best practices. During its first meeting, a panel of various participants from large and small hospital systems and academic medical institutions offered information to attendees about best practices for enrollment and data submission as well as lessons they learned during implementation of the registry in their respective institutions. 

AJRR bigwigs are planning future networking opportunities for the Group, including face-to-face meetings, webinars, list serves, social media sharing and quarterly phone calls. Executives also are setting up a User Group Advisory Board, which eventually will be tasked with setting the tone for future discussion topics and meetings, and providing data to Network participants.

"Users of our registry come in all different shapes and sizes -- from individual surgeon groups to  large health systems. The premise behind our User Group Network is to share stories among the sites so they can hear firsthand how to utilize the registry to its full potential," said Lori Boukas, director of marketing and communications. "We currently have close to 450 user sites, and there's a great wealth of knowledge to be shared within that group. We're glad to be able to offer a way for these users to convene and share best registry practices."

The AJRR boosted its profile during the AAOS meeting by flushing out its Board of Directors, adding Brian S. Parsley, M.D., (American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons representative). He joins newcomers Michael R. Dayton, M.D., (AAOS representative); Craig J. Della Valle, M.D., (The Knee Society representative); and Blair Fraser (industry representative).

"At the end of last year we increased the number of representatives by two to more accurately reflect our constituent groups. We are pleased to welcome the second member from AAHKS on our board and look forward to our deepening relationship," AJRR Executive Director Jeffrey P. Knezovich, C.A.E., said. "As the national registry that focuses on hip and knee joint replacement procedures, our missions are a perfect complement to each other."

The AJRR Executive Committee has undergone a few changes as well. Former AAOS president Daniel J. Berry, M.D., replaces outgoing Chairman William J. Maloney, M.D.; and David E. Mino, M.D., replaces outgoing Secretary Treasurer Steven H. Stern, M.D. The new vice-chairman is Kevin J. Bozic, M.D.

Terence J. Goie, M.D., and Eric Rugo also stepped down from the board. "We had a lot of successes and momentum during the last couple of years, and we would like to thank the outgoing board members for their hard work and dedication," Knezovich said. "AJRR would like to acknowledge the service of those who have served their term on the Board, including the past chair Dr. Maloney, and secretary treasurer Dr. Stern."

The American Joint Replacement Registry is a multi-stakeholder, independent, non-profit organization for data collection and quality improvement initiatives in total hip and knee replacements. As of February 2015, the AJRR contains hip and knee procedural data from nearly 450 hospitals and 2,900 surgeons in all 50 states. The registry is increasing at a rate of 2,500 procedures each week; to date, it contains information on more than 190,000 procedures. - See more at: http://www.odtmag.com/contents/view_breaking-news/2015-03-26/ajrr-launches-total-joint-replacement-risk-calculator-at-aaos-meeting/#sthash.AUy0srEf.dpuf
The American Joint Replacement Registry is a multi-stakeholder, independent, non-profit organization for data collection and quality improvement initiatives in total hip and knee replacements. As of February 2015, the AJRR contains hip and knee procedural data from nearly 450 hospitals and 2,900 surgeons in all 50 states. The registry is increasing at a rate of 2,500 procedures each week; to date, it contains information on more than 190,000 procedures.




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